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Democratic Education – learning through play, place and natural curiosity

Democratic education builds on the natural desire and capability of children to be curious and learn. It is widely accepted that babies and toddlers learn in their own time without much intervention. The skills that children develop within the first four years of their life are enormous. They learn: – To sit and walk, – To speak…

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Our Montessori Journey: Guest Post by Jessica Marley

I was attending a community college for my associate’s degree in early childhood education when my professor suggested that I do my internship at a Montessori school in the area. I was working at the time at a traditional Christian day care and had no idea what Montessori was, so happily agreed to the new…

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To school or not to school?: *guest post* by Ariel Pelham

This is my eldest son, Little O.  He’s five years old. He’s pretty amazing.  I’d go as far as to say he’s downright awesome, actually.  Here’s another photo of him so you can see just how special he is.     Little O, in addition to being hilarious, rambunctious, naughty, vocal, sweet, and obsessed with…

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“I’m a bit less crunchy granola than I thought”: guest post by Emma Taylor

Picture the scene. My daughter is sprawled on the kitchen floor, cheeks flushed, surrounded by wildflowers collected on a nature walk. She’s drawing them, observing their details and interpreting them in ways I couldn’t have imagined, inspiring me to concoct art projects we can base on her drawings, that will help her explore ideas around…

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In Defence of the State: *guest post* by Rowena Pelham

The best way to educate your young ones is a contentious topic on which people have deeply held opinions, and I’m no exception. I’m a parent of nursery- and school-aged children, but I’m also a teacher in a state school so I’m either the best or worst person to write this post (I’ll let you…

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The case for Unschooling, a *guest post* by Rob Neith-Nicholson

Homeschooling is the obvious choice for us to educate our child, Orin. We live a nomadic lifestyle, travelling up and down the UK on sculpture commissions. Our lifestyle doesn’t facilitate mainstream schooling but this isn’t the only reason that we’re advocates of homeschooling, and in particular unschooling. We feel that outsourcing our child’s education is…

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Embarking on the unschooling path: *guest post* by Sheena Hatton

    One month ago we made the life-changing decision to unschool our 5 year old. This time last year he was in reception class and we were awaiting the birth of his brother; this year he’s spent the day at work with his Dad, riding his bike through puddles and playing with Playdoh at…

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